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Fort Carson Soldier dies at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan

 

Late yesterday, the Department of Defense announced the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel in Afghanistan.

Staff Sgt. Diobanjo S. Sanagustin, 32, from National City, California, died Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2018, from a non-combat related injury at Bagram Airfield in Parwan Province, Afghanistan.

The military states the incident is under investigation.

Staff Sgt. Sanagustin was assigned to 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colorado.  He was serving as a squad leader in Bravo Company.

According to the San Diego Union-Tribune, Sanagustin was a three-time deployed Soldier who joined the Army in 2007. He had done tours in Kosovo, Iraq, and Afghanistan.  His awards include two Army Commendation Medals, seven Army Achievement Medals and four Good Conduct Medals.

Additional information regarding Staff Sgt. Diobanjo S. Sanagustin, including marital status and other commendations is available to media sources by contacting the Fort Carson Public Affairs Office at (719) 526-4143/7525.

Staff Sgt. Sanagustin is the second Soldier to die in Afghanistan this week.  Command Sgt. Maj. Timothy A. Bolyard, 42, from Thornton, West Virginia, died Sept. 3, 2018, of wounds sustained from small arms fire in Logar Province, Afghanistan. The deadly incident was reportedly due to an insider attack.  CSM Bolyard, who was on his thirteenth deployment, was assigned to 3rd Squadron, 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade, Fort Benning, Georgia.

 

 

Multiple Myeloma claims life of hardest fighting State Trooper in Washington State

 

This morning it was learned that Renee Padgett, 50, a Washington State Trooper lost her long-fought battle with cancer, yesterday, September 4, 2018. 

More than five years ago, Renee Padgett’s name came my way when was I was writing stories for the Examiner Online; I wrote military and military-related articles to include stories of law enforcement officers, firefighters, and the occasional hero K-9 story. I dedicated several stories to Renee’s ups and downs as she tried every treatment that was offered.  She had successful treatments and those that proved to be not as promising as she hoped.

Multiple myeloma is a rare cancer of the white blood cells.  While there are several approaches to treatment, sadly, the end result is never good.  No one fought harder to take on this disease than Trooper Padgett.

The Examiner stories about Padgett, and her fight to beat cancer, were long-lost when the online publication closed the site two years ago. I would love to republish them today.

Trooper Padgett was a Washington State Trooper for 27 years.  She spent her entire career in King County.

Funeral services and memorial services are still pending.

To Trooper Renee Padgett: “Thank you for your service and dedication to your community and your dedication to upholding and enforcing the laws of the State of Washington.  You will be missed by many.”

 

 

 

 

U.S. Security Force Command Sgt. Major killed in Afghanistan

 

Late yesterday, the Department of Defense announced the death of a career soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel in Afghanistan.

Command Sgt. Maj. Timothy A. Bolyard, 42, from Thornton, West Virginia, died Sept. 3, 2018, of wounds sustained from small arms fire in Logar Province, Afghanistan. While officially, the Pentagon says the incident is under investigation, news reports indicate CSM Bolyard was killed by an insurgent dressed as a soldier in an “insider attack.”

According to Army Times, one other soldier was wounded in the same attack. Officials said that soldier was in stable condition.

Bolyard was assigned to 3rd Squadron, 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade, Fort Benning, Georgia.  He was the sixth U.S. service member killed in Afghanistan so far this year.

Army Times: 

Bolyard, who joined the Army in June 1994, was an armor/cavalry scout senior sergeant who served as the squadron command sergeant major for Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 3rd Squadron, 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade, of Fort Benning, Georgia, according to the Army.

His awards and decorations include six Bronze Star Medals, two of them with Valor, four Meritorious Service Medals, six Army Commendation Medals, nine Army Achievement Medals, the Iraq Campaign Medal with four Campaign Stars, the Kosovo Campaign Medal with Bronze Service Star and the Combat Action Badge.

Yesterday, his son, Preston, penned these words:  

Since the news has gotten out, I just wanted to let everyone know that less than 24 hours ago my life has instantly changed forever. Being apart of a military family is hard as is. Especially when it comes to not being able to see my father Tim Bolyard. Less than 24 hours ago, two guys in military uniforms came to my door. They asked us to sit down and talk with us where they told us that my dad has been killed in Afghanistan. The news doesn’t feel real whatsoever. He was an amazing man. A great father, husband, and friend to many people. My dad is definitely my hero. Words cannot explain the love I have for this man. It really hurts to know he was gone. He was less than 2 months away from being home then thinking about retirement. Thank you for your service Dad. You will never be forgotten. Thank you for all the amazing memories and life lessons you have taught me. I love you CSM Bull. Until we meet again. Thank you for picking me (literally because he adopted me). I couldn’t have asked for such an amazing father.  

Additional information regarding Command Sgt. Maj. Timothy A. Bolyard is available to news sources by contacting the 1st Security Force Assistance Command Public Affairs at (910) 570-7200. (North Carolina)

 

 

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